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Daily Productive Sharing 420 - The War Impact to the Tech Industry

Daily Productive Sharing 420 - The War Impact to the Tech Industry
Photo by Levi Meir Clancy / Unsplash

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(下附中文版)

#Misc

This article by Gergely Orosz is a very comprehensive account of the impact of the war on the Ukrainian/Russian technology industry.

  1. It’s tempting to follow the footsteps of sanctions that countries are doing. But will it have the effect that these companies hope: that is, helping to end the conflict sooner?
  2. Until now, Ukraine had the pull of family, low taxes in the IT sector, and relative stability, save for the East of Ukraine.
  3. Ukraine has been so popular because there is good senior engineering talent to hire, and because - unlike most of Europe - notice periods are short, and given a good budget, it’s easy enough to hire senior tech talent, relatively quickly.
  4. Companies are starting mass evacuation efforts from Russia, starting on 28 February.
  5. Companies employing remote Russian contractors are starting to see major problems paying these contractors.
  6. Those working in tech in Russia are some of the most employable people, and also those with likely some amount of savings.
  7. If you have colleagues from Eastern/Central Europe, especially in countries neighboring Ukraine or Russia (Finland, Poland, Romania, Moldova, Slovakia, Hungary) know that most of them will be stressed and worried if and how this war can spread and impact them.

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Gergely Orosz 的这篇文章非常全面介绍战争对于乌克兰/俄罗斯两国科技业的影响:

  1. 跟随各国制裁的步伐当然是很诱人的。但是,这是否有助于更快地结束冲突?
  2. 直到战争前,乌克兰有低税率以及相对的工作稳定性。
  3. 乌克兰之所以如此受欢迎,是因为有优秀的高级工程人才可以雇佣,而且--与欧洲大部分地区不同--通知期很短。只要有良好的预算,就可以很容易地雇佣高级技术人才,而且相对较快。
  4. 公司正开始从俄罗斯大规模撤离,从2月28日开始。
  5. 雇用俄罗斯远程雇员的公司开始发现支付这些雇员的重大问题。
  6. 在俄罗斯从事技术工作的人是一些最容易就业的人,也是那些可能有一些储蓄的人。
  7. 如果你有来自东欧/中欧的同事,特别是在乌克兰或俄罗斯的邻国(芬兰、波兰、罗马尼亚、摩尔多瓦、斯洛伐克、匈牙利),要知道他们中的大多数人都会有压力,担心这场战争是否会蔓延并影响他们。

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The Ukraine War - and Its Impact on the Tech Industry

Excerpt

On a personal one, I’m from Hungary, with my great grandparents and grandparents living through WW2, and the horror stories living through war passed down generation after generation.
Ukraine has become a preferred destination for many companies to both hire full-time employees, and especially to contract from.
Ukraine has been so popular because there is good senior engineering talent to hire, and because - unlike most of Europe - notice periods are short, and given a good budget, it’s easy enough to hire senior tech talent, relatively quickly.
EPAM is Ukraine’s largest tech company, employing more than 10,000 people, the majority of them software engineers.
Some companies have transferred months’ worth of bonuses ahead of time and committed to paying full salaries to any employee joining the Ukrainian armed forces for the duration of their service.
On the first day of the war, an estimated 30,000 people crossed the Polish border to go to Ukraine. Some of them went to bring their families back, while some others did so to join the fight for their homeland like this Ukrainian war veteran did.
Sure, it’s tempting to follow the footsteps of sanctions that countries are doing. But will it have the effect that these companies hope: that is, helping to end the conflict sooner?
At the same time, Belarus and Russia are increasingly seen as unstable places to operate from, and I expect more companies with tech employees in these countries to at the very least explore opening offices in the EU, and relocate employees who are open to this opportunity.
Most neighboring countries on the West of Ukraine are allowing Ukrainians through, often even without a passport.
Both Ireland and Portugal removed the previous visa requirement on entry for Ukrainians, opening borders to refugees.
EU nations agreed to accept Ukrainian refugees for 3 years without going through an asylum process on Sunday, 27 February.
Until now, Ukraine had the pull of family, low taxes in the IT sector, and relative stability, save for the East of Ukraine.
There are, after all, many companies with Russian offices who would want to move staff.
Companies are starting mass evacuation efforts from Russia, starting on 28 February.
Companies employing remote Russian contractors are starting to see major problems paying these contractors.
Another reason that could push Russian tech professionals to either work remote for USD / EUR compensation or to consider moving abroad is the ongoing collapse of the Rubel
It would be the interest of Europe and the EU to make highly skilled immigration - and even asylums from Russia - easy. This would both help European countries hire sought-after software engineers in the middle of the hottest hiring market. Such a move would also hurt Russia, by losing tech expertise that is hard to replace.
Still, Europe should do exactly the opposite: make it very easy for highly skilled Russian workers to move to Europe, with the tech sector being an obvious destination.
Those working in tech in Russia are some of the most employable people, and also those with likely some amount of savings.
I’m terrified and feel the situation is as bad as it gets for Europe. Way worse than COVID. It’s the worst geopolitical event in my life.
If you have colleagues from Eastern/Central Europe, especially in countries neighboring Ukraine or Russia (Finland, Poland, Romania, Moldova, Slovakia, Hungary) know that most of them will be stressed and worried if and how this war can spread and impact them.