Daily Productive Sharing 091 - 如何每天读一千篇文章?

One helpful tip per day:)

(The English version follows)

如何每天读一千篇文章?如何坚持这一习惯很多年?The EconomistThe Financial Times 前驻莫斯科首席记者 Robert Cottrell 给出了自己的答案:

  1. 使用 iPad 阅读,每天最高效的阅读时间实在早上的通勤上;
  2. 使用 Feedly 订阅 700 多个 RSS,使用 Pinboard 保存有用的文章,使用 Bear 编辑最后留下来的文章;
  3. 使用 Substack 来发布邮件列表。
  4. 头条是最值得关心的文章,因为它们通常是新闻机构里最好的人写的;
  5. 很多时候看文章直接跟作者就行,不管这个作者在哪发表;
  6. 好文章要能长久地流传有三要素:1. 足够有意思,2. 观点足够强,3. 写作足够好(通常用第一人称叙述)
What I'm trying to do is find pieces of writing each day which are of lasting value.
Pieces with lasting value do three things: share really interesting ideas, deploy strong arguments, and have particularly fine writing — typically in first person.
I do this on my iPad. The iPad is my workhorse.
I do an awful lot of my reading on public transport and the iPad allows me to continue to be productive. Half an hour on the tube can be some of my most productive time.
I put quite a lot of trust in headlines, oddly enough, because I figure that headlines are written by loyal allies of the writers who are paid to find and express what is best in the piece.
So if the headline writer cannot produce a compelling headline then that is a very strong indicator that there’s not much good in the piece.
The more I read the more I become persuaded that the real guarantee of quality in a piece is that the person who’s written it is great.

The Man Who Reads 1,000 Articles a Day

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How to read a thousand articles a day? How do you stick to this habit for many years? Robert Cottrell, former chief correspondent for The Economist and The Financial Times in Moscow, gives his answer:

  1. He uses iPad to read, the most efficient time to read each day is during the morning commute.
  2. He uses Feedly to subscribe to over 700 RSS feeds, Pinboard to save useful articles, and Bear to edit the last remaining articles.
  3. He uses Substack to distribute mailing lists.
  4. Headlines are the articles of most interest because they are usually written by the best people in news organizations.
  5. He often just follows the author, regardless of where the author is published.
  6. Three elements make a good article last: 1) it is interesting enough, 2) the point of view is strong enough, and 3) the writing is good enough (usually in the first person).
What I'm trying to do is find pieces of writing each day which are of lasting value.
Pieces with lasting value do three things: share really interesting ideas, deploy strong arguments, and have particularly fine writing — typically in first person.
I do this on my iPad. The iPad is my workhorse.
I do an awful lot of my reading on public transport and the iPad allows me to continue to be productive. Half an hour on the tube can be some of my most productive time.
I put quite a lot of trust in headlines, oddly enough, because I figure that headlines are written by loyal allies of the writers who are paid to find and express what is best in the piece.
So if the headline writer cannot produce a compelling headline then that is a very strong indicator that there’s not much good in the piece.
The more I read the more I become persuaded that the real guarantee of quality in a piece is that the person who’s written it is great.

The Man Who Reads 1,000 Articles a Day

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Jamie Larson
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