Daily Productive Sharing 095 - 如何借助名人的成功让自己成功?

One helpful tip per day:)

(The English version follows)

Angelist 是世界上最大的天使投资平台,它是由 Naval Ravikant 创建的。Naval 经常在互联网上发表自己独到的见解,比如之前曾在 Twitter 上连载了一系列 How to get rich 的建议。今天分享中的主人公 Eric Jorgenson 搜集了 Naval 历年的高见,花了两年时间把它们整理成一本书。在这一过程中,获得了 Naval 的帮助,同时 Eric 自己也变得小有名气。这倒和 The Third Door 的作者 Alex Banayan 的经历颇为相似。

反观简体中文,类似的领袖人物有吗?任大炮?王兴?

I’ve recently published a book called The Almanack of Naval Ravikant, a collection of Naval’s insights from his Twitter, podcasts, essays, and talks.
My basic philosophy is that if I’m going to spend years of my life working on growth, I want a robust document that contains everything I’m learning and want to retain on the subject.
I know that people do this kind of thing in Evernote with amazing results, but I’m fluent in Google Docs already, and I'm not enough of a tool nerd to really want to spend a whole weekend learning a new system.
Naval sent me a library of all his tweets—20,000 of them—which I exported into a CSV, marking the ones I thought were good, timeless, or relevant.
I read every word in the document multiple times as I organized and reorganized and merged chapters, then separated and reordered them. It took two years of nights and weekends to get all of that in place.
The chapters that were universally appealing, though, were the sections on wealth and happiness. Go figure: turns out people want to be rich and happy.
The idea is that the finished product is basically a book where the tweets are presented as aphorisms. You can just rifle through it and pick up the big ideas. If one of those ideas attracts you, you can then dive into the text around it to get a more fleshed-out version of the concept.
The Lindy Effect, which is a quick mental model for considering how timeless something might be. It’s the idea that we exist at the half-life of something’s relevance. If something has been around for 50 years, you can assume it will be around for 50 more years. And if something's been around for two thousand years, it will likely be around for another two thousand.

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Angelist, the world's largest angel investment platform, was founded by Naval Ravikant, who is a frequent contributor of insights to the Internet, such as a series of How to get rich that were previously posted on Twitter. Eric Jorgenson, the main character in today's post, collected Naval's insights over the years and spent two years compiling them into a book. In the process, he received help from Naval, and Eric himself became famous. This is quite similar to the author of The Third Door Alex Banayan's experience.

I’ve recently published a book called The Almanack of Naval Ravikant, a collection of Naval’s insights from his Twitter, podcasts, essays, and talks.
My basic philosophy is that if I’m going to spend years of my life working on growth, I want a robust document that contains everything I’m learning and want to retain on the subject.
I know that people do this kind of thing in Evernote with amazing results, but I’m fluent in Google Docs already, and I'm not enough of a tool nerd to really want to spend a whole weekend learning a new system.
Naval sent me a library of all his tweets—20,000 of them—which I exported into a CSV, marking the ones I thought were good, timeless, or relevant.
I read every word in the document multiple times as I organized and reorganized and merged chapters, then separated and reordered them. It took two years of nights and weekends to get all of that in place.
The chapters that were universally appealing, though, were the sections on wealth and happiness. Go figure: turns out people want to be rich and happy.
The idea is that the finished product is basically a book where the tweets are presented as aphorisms. You can just rifle through it and pick up the big ideas. If one of those ideas attracts you, you can then dive into the text around it to get a more fleshed-out version of the concept.
The Lindy Effect, which is a quick mental model for considering how timeless something might be. It’s the idea that we exist at the half-life of something’s relevance. If something has been around for 50 years, you can assume it will be around for 50 more years. And if something's been around for two thousand years, it will likely be around for another two thousand.

Get 20% off for 1 year

Hunting Knowledge with Eric Jorgenson

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