Daily Productive Sharing 125 - What is it like as the Most Successful Tech Youtuber?

One helpful tip per day:)

(The English version follows)

#Misc

MKBHD 是 Youtube 上最成功的科技博主之一,谁曾想过,2009年,他拿着一台惠普笔记本开始了这一历程?在 Verge 这期的访谈中,MKBHD 介绍了自己的经历:

  1. 尽管已经如此成功,99% 的视频剪辑还是由他亲自完成;
  2. 他从未做过厂商赞助视频,所有的视频都是他决定内容的;
  3. 他对自己有极其清醒的认识,他知道很多人不仅仅把他当作一个博主看待,所以他很注重自己的言行,并且希望这一平台影响更多的人;
  4. 他观看大量其他 YouTube 博主的视频,学习并获得灵感;
  5. 他的收入有一半来自视频中的插入广告,40% 来自 Adsense 分成,以及自己的商店;

欢迎转发,感谢分享:)

原链

The Business of Influence With MKBHD

# Marques Brownlee on how to scale MKBHD while being the face of the YouTube brand

Subscribe now

如果你想更好地管理时间,并且减轻自己的压力,不妨试试 BRNR List

如果你也想成为更高效的人,欢迎加入我们的 TG group

如果大家使用邮件订阅,请把 acacess@substack.com 添加为邮箱联系人,避免邮箱过滤的误伤,谢谢:)


MKBHD is one of the most successful tech Youtuber, and who would have thought that he would have started this journey with an HP laptop in 2009? In this interview with the Verge, MKBHD describes his experience: 1.

  1. despite being so successful, he still does 99% of the video editing himself.
  2. he has never done a vendor-sponsored video, and he decides the content of all his videos
  3. he is extremely conscious of himself and knows that many people see him as more than just a Youtuber, so he is very conscious of what he says and does and wants the platform to reach more people
  4. he watches a lot of videos from other YouTube bloggers to learn and get inspired
  5. that half of his income comes from sponsored integrations in videos, 40% from Adsense share, and his merch store.

The Business of Influence With MKBHD

# Marques Brownlee on how to scale MKBHD while being the face of the YouTube brand

Subscribe now

Try our sustainable productivity tool BRNR List


Excerpt

And he’s been in the game for a long time: he started the channel MKBHD in 2009 when he was just a teenager making videos about his new HP laptop.

When I finally bought a laptop and saw some stuff with the laptop that I didn’t see in those videos, my natural response was to turn on a webcam, talk about those things, and upload it to YouTube, just in case someone else was watching videos to choose what to buy.

I think a lot of people, when they imagine a YouTube channel, don’t imagine very much work behind it.

First, being a YouTuber is a bunch of different jobs in one. Let’s say you’re a tech YouTuber. Part of your job is writing, part of your job is being on camera, part of your job is shooting the video, part of your job is editing the video, and part of your job is promoting, uploading, sharing, and content strategy.

But I’m 99 percent of the edit, I’m writing everything, and I think at the end of the day, it’s still my face and it’s still my presentation of my ideas.

I watch a lot of YouTube. I watch a lot of tech videos, and I watch a lot of all kinds of other videos. I get inspiration from all kinds of places.

It’s just an internal driving light of like, let’s try things, let’s do more, and let’s do better.

Generally, the fundamental building blocks of making money as a YouTuber, and for me, come from AdSense built into YouTube, sponsored integrations built into the videos and on the channel, and merch stuff, too.

So when people watch an MKBHD video, they’re watching me on camera, but they’re watching a lot of my words and my experiences being translated into a video form.

If you can’t get your idea down in a couple sentences in an email, it’s probably not a good enough idea.

We say no to 99 percent of the things that we get offered to do. But that last 1 percent of things, we think very deeply about, and work with a lot of people to try to make the right decisions and pull it off well.

Revenue is probably about 40 percent from YouTube AdSense, strictly those ads that get placed. Probably 50 percent sponsored integrations that we build into the channel and the videos. And the last 10 percent is miscellaneous.

I’ve done deals with companies whose other products I’ve reviewed, but I’ve never done a review that is sponsored.

I’ve given lots of bad reviews in the past to things I really don’t like, and that has never had any effect on my relationship with the company that made that thing.

I’m contributing to this wealth of information about a product so you can make a purchase decision. That’s the fundamental thing that I’m doing.

You might look up to Marques the YouTuber or the tech reviewer, but ideally nothing else about me is on your radar as far as celebrity culture goes. I realize not everyone thinks that way. So I try to make the best of it and use my platform for positive work rather than negative.

But if you look back, I started with the HP Pavilion dv7t and my first hundred-something videos were all about software and accessories for that one laptop.

Subscribe to Sustainable Productivity

Sign up now to get access to the library of members-only issues.
Jamie Larson
Subscribe