Daily Productive Sharing 162 - How to Find Time to Read?

One helpful tip per day:)

(The English version follows)

#reading_tips

很多朋友可能都会说自己没时间读书,可是果真如此吗?找时间读书的本质是如何分配有限的时间,如何合理地分配有限的时间。今天的分享中,作者从多个角度分析了如何找时间读书,他最终分配了不少时间来完成这些任务。

如果你觉得今天分享有帮助,不妨把它分享给你的朋友

原链

The Best Way to Find More Time to Read

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Many of you may say that you don't have time to read, but is this really the truth? The essence of finding time to read is how to allocate limited time, and how to allocate limited time wisely. In today's sharing, the author analyses how to find time to read from a number of perspectives, and he ends up allocating a lot of time to these tasks.

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Excerpt

As simple as it sounds, finding time to read boils down to choices about how you allocate your time.

After I finish a book, I let it age for a week or two and then pick it up again. I look at my notes and the sections I’ve marked as important. I write them down.

Reading isn’t something to be done once a week to check a box; it’s something to do every day.

Finding time to read is easier than you might think. Waiting for a bus? Stop staring down the street and read. Waiting for a taxi? Read. On the train? Read. On the plane? Read. Waiting for your flight? Read.

If I know I have only a few minutes, I’m not going to read something that requires a lot of mental context switching to get back into. I’ll keep it simple.

Early in the evening, say around 8 or 9, I’ll grab a glass of wine and sink into something serious. Something I want to read without interruption. Some nights I’ll read well past midnight; other nights I’ll stop reading around 10 or 11.

After I graduated from university, I made a choice that I’ve rarely deviated from: I don’t worry about any money spent on books. I’m not alone. I know other people do this, too.

The first thing I did when I started making money was to call my younger brothers and tell them that until they graduated high school, I’d buy them whatever books they wanted as long as they promised to read them. As many as they wanted; whatever they wanted.

To me, reading is more than a raw input. I read to increase knowledge. I read to find meaning. I read for better understanding of others and myself. I read to discover. I read to make my life better. I read to make fewer mistakes.

We’ve been recording knowledge in books for a long time. That means there’s not a lot that’s new; it’s just recycled old knowledge.

I take that one step further: If you’re not keeping what you read, you probably want to think about what you’re reading and how.

“The rich invest in time, the poor invest in money.”

How do you value your time? We can make more money; we can’t make more time.

Side effects of reading more may include (1) increased intelligence; (2) an uncomfortable silence when someone asks you what happened on _Game of Thrones_last night and you say “Game of what?”; (3) better ideas; and (4) increased understanding of yourself and others.— Warren Buffett

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Jamie Larson
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