Weekly Book Club 034 - The Power of Habit

The Power of Habit is a critically acclaimed book that explores the relationship between productivity and habit. The book presents a framework of cue - reward - carving - routine, which sets the foundation for other works to follow. For example, Atomic Habits.

One book per week:)

(The English version follow)

The Power of Habit 是一本广受好评的效率类书籍,探讨了生产力和习惯的关系。这本书提出了 cue - reward - carving - routine 这一框架, 为后续其他作品奠定了基础。比如 Atomic Habits Weekly Book Club 023 - 20210320 也沿用了这一框架。作者对于生产力的理解非常独到:

Productivity, put simply, is the name we give our attempts to figure out the best uses of our energy, intellect, and time as we try to seize the most meaningful rewards with the least wasted effort.

毕竟作者本人也是非常高产,除了出版了The Power of HabitSmarter Faster Better 两本畅销书以外,他还拿过普利策奖

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The Power of Habit

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The Power of Habit is a critically acclaimed book that explores the relationship between productivity and habit. The book presents a framework of cue - reward - carving - routine, which sets the foundation for other works to follow. For example, Atomic Habits Weekly Book Club 023 - 20210320 also follows this framework. The author's understanding of productivity is insightful:

Productivity, put simply, is the name we give our attempts to figure out the best uses of our energy, intellect, and time as we try to seize the most meaningful rewards with the least wasted effort.

After all, the author himself is very prolific, having won the Pulitzer Prize in addition to publishing two best-selling books, The Power of Habit and Smarter Faster Better.

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The Power of Habit

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Top Quotes

When a habit emerges, the brain stops fully participating in decision making. It stops working so hard, or diverts focus to other tasks. So unless you deliberately fight a habit—unless you find new routines—the pattern will unfold automatically.
This is how new habits are created: by putting together a cue, a routine, and a reward, and then cultivating a craving that drives the loop
Cravings are what drive habits. And figuring out how to spark a craving makes creating a new habit easier.
Rather, to change a habit, you must keep the old cue, and deliver the old reward, but insert a new routine.
If you identify the cues and rewards, you can change the routine.
The solution, Starbucks discovered, was turning self-discipline into an organizational habit.
This is how willpower becomes a habit: by choosing a certain behavior ahead of time, and then following that routine when an inflection point arrives.
DJs started making sure that whenever “Hey Ya!” was played, it was sandwiched between songs that were already popular.
People, it turns out, often go to the gym looking for a human connection, not a treadmill
Only when your brain starts expecting the reward—craving the endorphins or sense of accomplishment—will it become automatic to lace up your jogging shoes each morning.
Our weak-tie acquaintances are often as influential—if not more—than our close-tie friends.
Sometimes people need a jolt, and all the bad publicity was a serious jolt. It gave us a chance to reexamine everything.
We can make toothpaste taste like anything—blueberries, green tea—and as long as it has a cool tingle, people feel like their mouth is clean. The tingling doesn’t make the toothpaste work any better. It just convinces people it’s doing the job.
That’s the rule: If you use the same cue, and provide the same reward, you can shift the routine and change the habit. Almost any behavior can be transformed if the cue and reward stay the same.
The truth is, the brain can be reprogrammed. You just have to be deliberate about it.
But we do know that for habits to permanently change, people must believe that change is feasible.
For a habit to stay changed, people must believe change is possible. And most often, that belief only emerges with the help of a group.
Keystone habits say that success doesn’t depend on getting every single thing right, but instead relies on identifying a few key priorities and fashioning them into powerful levers.
Dozens of studies show that willpower is the single most important keystone habit for individual success.

Archive

Weekly Book Club 033 - Start Small, Stay Small
Weekly Book Club 032 - The Millionaire Fastlane
Weekly Book Club 031 - How I Built This
Weekly Book Club 030 - The Tipping Point
Weekly Book Club 029 - The Psychology of Money
Weekly Book Club 028 - The Checklist Manifest
Weekly Book Club 027 - WTF?: What's the Future and Why It's Up to Us
Weekly Book Club 026 - How to Avoid A Climate Disaster
Weekly Book Club 025 - Daring Greatly
Weekly Book Club 024 - Rework
Weekly Book Club 023 - Atomic Habits
Weekly Book Club 022 - Good Strategy Bad Strategy
Weekly Book Club 021 - Nudge
Weekly Book Club 020 - Make Time
Weekly Book Club 019 - Keep Sharp
Weekly Book Club 018 - Why We Sleep
Weekly Book Club 017 - Your Brain at Work
Weekly Book Club 016 - How to Decide
Weekly Book Club 015 - The Almanack of Naval Ravikant
Weekly Book Club 014 - Finite and Infinite Games
Weekly Book Club 013 - Born a Crime
Weekly Book Club 012 - Measure What Matters
Weekly Book Club 011 - How Will Your Measure Your Life
Weekly Book Club 010 - Range
Weekly Book Club 009 - The Hard Thing About Hard Things
Weekly Book Club 008 - Talking to Crazy
Weekly Book Club 007 - Indistractable
Weekly Book Club 006 - Thinking in System
Weekly Book Club 005 - The Lean Startup
Weekly Book Club 004 - Let My People Go Surfing
Weekly Book Club 003 - It Doesn't Have to Be Crazy at Work
Weekly Book Club 002 - Writing My Wrongs
Weekly Book Club 001 - Poor Economics
Weekly Book Club 001 - Good Economics for Hard Times
Weekly Book Club 000 - The Motivation Myth

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